His dad inherited a life-altering disease. He had a 50-50 chance of having it too.

By Maz Ali
Photo by Ralph Arvesen/Flickr.

There are certain moments in our lives that are too important not to share with the people we love.
Singer-songwriter Eric Hutchinson is having one of those moments.

Hutchinson and his band recently embarked on a tour to promote his new album, which he was proud to have independently produced. They are set to perform in Hutchinson’s home state of Maryland at Merriweather Post Pavilion, an over 19,000-seat outdoor amphitheater that has hosted some of the most famed musicians in modern history.

This is one show Hutchinson doesn’t want his family to miss. And he’s especially excited for his dad to see him on the historic stage. But getting him there requires more than a VIP pass.
Before Hutchinson was big enough to pick up a guitar, his dad was diagnosed with an adult-onset form of muscular dystrophy (MD).

In the decades that followed, the disease progressively took away his father’s control of his own body.

Though Hutchinson was too young to fully grasp the situation at the time, as his father’s condition progressed, a frightening picture came slowly into focus.

“I don’t remember when I first found out about my dad’s disease, but I just knew that something was different,” he said. “But the older I got, the more I understood, and the more I worried.”

Then, in college, he learned more about MD that gave him concern for his own future.

Most muscular dystrophies are genetic. Hutchinson had a 50% chance of inheriting the gene flaw that caused his father’s MD.

“When am I going to wake up and feel something?” he wondered. “When my hands were tired, I worried that they were symptoms.”

And as his creative interests became a full-time music career, he had a hard time facing the possibility that it could be taken away so prematurely.

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